To live a love of hate

No matter what your colour, creed or race to discriminate due to colour, creed or race will only lead to hate

hate/heɪt/ Learn to pronounce verbverb: hate; 3rd person present: hates; past tense: hated; past participle: hated; gerund or present participle: hating

  1. feel intense dislike for.”the boys hate each other” h Similar:loathe

detest dislike greatly abhorabominate despise execrate feel aversion towards feel revulsion towards feel hostile towards be repelled by be revolted by regard with disgust not be able to bear/standbe unable to stomach find intolerable shudder atrecoil from shrink from hate someone’s guts disrelish h Opposite : love like

  • have a strong aversion to (something).”he hates flying”
  • used politely to express one’s regret or embarrassment at doing something.”I hate to bother you” h Similar:be sorry

be reluctant be loath be unwilling be disinclined regret dislike not like

    • hesitate
    • informal express strong dislike for; criticize or abuse.”I can’t hate on them for trying something new”

nounnoun: hate

  1. intense dislike.”feelings of hate and revenge” h Similar:loathing

hatred detestation dislike distaste abhorrence abomination execration resentment aversion hostility illwill illfeeling bad feeling enmity animosity antagonism antipathy bitterness animus revulsion disgust contempt repugnance odiumrancour disrelish h Opposite :love liking

  • denoting hostile actions motivated by intense dislike or prejudice.modifier noun: hate“a hate campaign”
  • informalan intensely disliked person or thing.plural noun: hates“Richard’s pet hate is filling in his tax returns” h Similar:bugbear

bane bogey buga boopet aversion thorn in one’s flesh/sidebane of one’s lifebête noire

    • h Opposite:favourite thing

Origin

Religious views of Adolf Hitler

Adolf Hitler’s religious beliefs have been a matter of debate. Historians regard Hitler as having anti-Christian[1] and anti-atheist views.[2]

Hitler was born to a practicing Catholic mother, and was baptized in the Roman Catholic Church. In 1904, he was confirmed at the Roman Catholic Cathedral in Linz, Austria, where the family lived.[3] According to John Willard Toland, witnesses indicate that Hitler’s confirmation sponsor had to “drag the words out of him … almost as though the whole confirmation was repugnant to him”.[4] Rissmann notes that, according to several witnesses who lived with Hitler in a men’s home in Vienna, he never again attended Mass or received the sacraments after leaving home at 18 years old.[5]

In his book Mein Kampf and in public speeches prior to and in the early years of his rule, Hitler expressed himself as a Christian.[6][7][8] Hitler and the Nazi party promoted “Positive Christianity“,[9] a movement which rejected most traditional Christian doctrines such as the divinity of Jesus, as well as Jewish elements such as the Old Testament.[10][11] In one widely quoted remark, he described Jesus as an “Aryan fighter” who struggled against “the power and pretensions of the corrupt Pharisees”[12] and Jewish materialism.[13] In his private diaries, Goebbels wrote in April 1941 that though Hitler was “a fierce opponent” of the Vatican and Christianity, “he forbids me to leave the church. For tactical reasons.”[14]

Hitler’s regime launched an effort toward coordination of German Protestants under a unified Protestant Reich Church (but this was resisted by the Confessing Church), and moved early to eliminate political Catholicism.[15] Hitler agreed to the Reich concordat with the Vatican, but then routinely ignored it, and permitted persecutions of the Catholic Church.[16] Smaller religious minorities faced harsher repression, with the Jews of Germany expelled for extermination on the grounds of Nazi racial ideology. Jehovah’s Witnesses were ruthlessly persecuted for refusing both military service and allegiance to Hitler’s movement. Although he was prepared to delay conflicts for political reasons, historians conclude that he ultimately intended the destruction of Christianity in Germany, or at least its distortion or subjugation to a Nazi outlook.[17]

Violence begets violence

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search For the album by Jedi Mind Tricks, see Violence Begets Violence.

It Shoots Further Than He Dreams by John F. Knott, March 1918.

The phrase “violence begets violence” (or “hate begets hate”) means that violent behaviour promotes other violent behaviour, in return. The phrase has been used since the 1830s.[1]

Violence begets violence is a concept described in the Gospel of Matthew, verse 26:52.[2][3][4] The passage depicts a disciple (identified in the Gospel of John as Saint Peter) drawing a sword to defend against the arrest of Jesus but being told to sheath his weapon:

“Put your sword back in its place,” Jesus said to him, “for all who draw the sword will die by the sword.”[5]

Words by Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–1968) used the phrase when saying:[6][7][8]

Hate begets hate; violence begets violence; toughness begets a greater toughness. We must meet the forces of hate with the power of love… Our aim must never be to defeat or humiliate the white man, but to win his friendship and understanding.[6]

Published by Huwspace - the lightning seed

A welsh lad born in 1976 the year of the fire dragon. Now living in Devon

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