Lady Liberty

What does Lady Liberty represent? The Statue of Liberty stands in Upper New York Bay, a universal symbol of freedom. Originally conceived as an emblem of the friendship between the people of France and the U.S. and a sign of their mutual desire for liberty, over the years the Statue has become much more.

Godless Trump

godless/ˈɡɒdləs/ Learn to pronounce adjective adjective: godless

  1. not believing in God.”a sceptical, godless society” h Similar: atheistic

unbelievingnon-believing non-theistic agnostic sceptical heretical faithless irreligious ungodly unholy impious profane infidel barbarian barbarous heathen heathenish idolatrous pagan satanic devilish fiendish demonic diabolical infernal nullifidian h

Opposite:religious

  • without a god.”humanity coming to terms with a godless world”
  • profane; wicked.”a mob reeling out from their godless pleasures” h Similar :immoral

wicked sinful wrong morally wrong wrongful evil

Bishop ‘outraged’ over Trump’s church photo op during George Floyd protests

The Rev Mariann Budde says the institution aligns itself with those seeking justice for Floyd’s death.

The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World; French: La Liberté éclairant le monde) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York, in the United States. The copper statue, a gift from the people of France to the people of the United States, was designed by French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and its metal framework was built by Gustave Eiffel. The statue was dedicated on October 28, 1886.

The statue is a figure of Libertas, a robed Roman liberty goddess. She holds a torch above her head with her right hand, and in her left hand carries a tabula ansata inscribed JULY IV MDCCLXXVI (July 4, 1776 in Roman numerals), the date of the U.S. Declaration of Independence. A broken shackle and chain lie at her feet as she walks forward, commemorating the recent national abolition of slavery.[8] After its dedication, the statue became an icon of freedom and of the United States, seen as a symbol of welcome to immigrants arriving by sea.

What is Freedom?

freedom/ˈfriːdəm/ Learn to pronounce nounnoun: freedom; noun: freedom from; plural noun: freedom froms; plural noun: freedoms

  1. 1. the power or right to act, speak, or think as one wants.”we do have some freedom of choice” h Similar:right to

entitlement to privilege prerogative due

  • absence of subjection to foreign domination or despotic government. “he was a champion of Irish freedom” h Similar:independence

self-government self-determination self-legislation self rule home rule sovereignty autonomy autarky democracy self-sufficiency individualism separation non-alignment emancipation enfranchisement manumission h Opposite:dependence the power of self-determination attributed to the will; the quality of being independent of fate or necessity. h Similar: scope latitude leeway margin flexibility facility space breathing space room elbow room licence leave free reina free hand leisure carte blanche

  • h Opposite:restriction

2. the state of not being imprisoned or enslaved.”the shark thrashed its way to freedom” h Similar: liberty liberation release emancipation deliverance delivery dischargenon-confinemen textrication amnesty pardoning manumission disenthralment h Opposite:captivity

  • the state of being unrestricted and able to move easily.”the shorts have a side split for freedom of movement”
  • unrestricted use of something.”the dog has the freedom of the house when we are out”

3. the state of not being subject to or affected by (something undesirable).”government policies to achieve freedom from want” h Similar: exemption immunity dispensation exception exclusion release relief reprieve absolution exoneration impunity letting offa let-offderogation h Opposite:liability4. Britisha special privilege or right of access, especially that of full citizenship of a city granted to a public figure as an honour.”he accepted the freedom of the City of Glasgow”5. archaicfamiliarity or openness in speech or behaviour. h Similar: naturalness openness lack of reserve/inhibition casualness informality lack of ceremony spontaneity ingenuousness impudence familiarity over familiarity presumption forwardness

  1. cheek

Origin

Old English frēodōm (see free, -dom).Translate freedom toUse over time for: Freedom

Freedom Tree, Elizabeth Marina, St. Helier, Great Britain

Food for thought!

Ask not what you can do to your country but what your country can do to you.

President Trump is no Kennedy but let your country have a Future and your children have  a Mother or Father an Uncle or an Aunt a Grandparent or guide or most importantly let your future seed have a life.

Ich bin ein Berliner

Ich bin ein Berliner (German pronunciation: [ˈʔɪç ˈbɪn ʔaɪn bɛɐ̯ˈliːnɐ], “I am a Berliner“) is a speech by United States President John F. Kennedy given on June 26, 1963, in West Berlin. It is widely regarded as the best-known speech of the Cold War and the most famous anti-communist speech. Kennedy aimed to underline the support of the United States for West Germany 22 months after Soviet-occupied East Germany erected the Berlin Wall to prevent mass emigration to the West. The message was aimed as much at the Soviets as it was at Berliners and was a clear statement of U.S. policy in the wake of the construction of the Berlin Wall. Another phrase in the speech was also spoken in German, “Lasst sie nach Berlin kommen” (“Let them come to Berlin”), addressed at those who claimed “we can work with the Communists”, a remark at which Nikita Khrushchev scoffed only days later.

The speech is considered one of Kennedy’s best, both a notable moment of the Cold War and a high point of the New Frontier. It was a great morale boost for West Berliners, who lived in an enclave deep inside East Germany and feared a possible East German occupation. Speaking from a platform erected on the steps of Rathaus Schöneberg for an audience of 120,000, Kennedy said,

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https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c0/Audio-input-microphone.svg/50px-Audio-input-microphone.svg.pngIch bin ein Berliner (I am a Berliner) speech Play media Speech from the Rathaus Schöneberg by John F. Kennedy, June 26, 1963. Duration 9:01; “Ich bin ein Berliner” first appears at 1:45, then again at 8:43. Ich bin ein Berliner (“I am a Berliner”) speech (audio) Menu 0:00 Audio-only version (Duration 9:22)
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History of Berlin
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Margraviate of Brandenburg (1157–1806)
Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918)
German Empire (1871–1918)
Free State of Prussia (1918–1947)
Weimar Republic (1919–1933)
1920s Berlin Greater Berlin Act
Nazi Germany (1933–1945)
Welthauptstadt Germania Bombing of Berlin in World War II Battle of Berlin
West Germany and East Germany (1945–1990)
West Berlin and East Berlin Berlin Wall Berlin Blockade (1948–1949) Berlin Crisis of 1961 “Ich bin ein Berliner” (1963) “Tear Down This Wall” (1987) Fall of the Berlin Wall
Federal Republic of Germany (1990–present)
History of Germany and History of Europe
See also
Timeline of Berlin

June the 2nd 2020 – Where is the Love?