Nature · Politics · Republic

In God We Trust

James Mattis latest speech in full

I have watched this week’s unfolding events, angry and appalled. The words “Equal Justice Under Law” are carved in the pediment of the United States Supreme Court. This is precisely what protesters are rightly demanding. It is a wholesome and unifying demand-one that all of us should be able to get behind. We must not be distracted by a small number of lawbreakers. The protests are defined by tens of thousands of people of conscience who are insisting that we live up to our values-our values as people and our values as a nation.

When I joined the military, some 50 years ago, I swore an oath to support and defend the Constitution. Never did I dream that troops taking that same oath would be ordered under any circumstance to violate the Constitutional rights of their fellow citizens-much less to provide a bizarre photo op for the elected commander-in-chief, with military leadership standing alongside.

 We must reject any thinking of our cities as a “battlespace” that our uniformed military is called upon to “dominate.” At home, we should use our military only when requested to do so, on very rare occasions, by state governors. Militarizing our response, as we witnessed in Washington, D.C., sets up a conflict-a false conflict between the military and civilian society. It erodes the moral ground that ensures a trusted bond between men and women in uniform and the society they are sworn to protect, and of which they themselves are a part. Keeping public order rests with civilian state and local leaders who best understand their communities and are answerable to them.

James Madison wrote in Federalist 14 that “America united with a handful of troops, or without a single soldier, exhibits a more forbidding posture to foreign ambition than America disunited, with a hundred thousand veterans ready for combat.” We do not need to militarize our response to protests. We need to unite around a common purpose. And it starts by guaranteeing that all of us are equal before the law.

Instructions given by the military departments to our troops before the Normandy invasion reminded soldiers that “The Nazi slogan for destroying us…was `Divide and Conquer.’ Our American answer is `In Union there is Strength.” We must summon that unity to surmount this crisis-confident that we are better than our politics.

Donald Trump is the first president in my lifetime who does not try to unite the American people- does not even pretend to try. Instead he tries to divide us. We are witnessing the consequences of three years of this deliberate effort. We are witnessing the consequences of three years without mature leadership. We can unite without him, drawing on the strengths inherent in our civil society. This will not be easy, as the past few days have shown, but we owe it to our fellow citizens; to past generations that bled to defend our promise; and to our children.

We can come through this trying time stronger, and with a renewed sense of purpose and respect for one another. The pandemic has shown us that it is not only our troops who are willing to offer the ultimate sacrifice for the safety of the community. Americans in hospitals, grocery stores, post offices, and elsewhere have put their lives on the line in order to serve their fellow citizens and their country. We know that we are better than the abuse of executive authority that we witnessed in Lafayette Square. We must reject and hold accountable those in office who would make a mockery of our Constitution. At the same time, we must remember Lincoln’s “better angels,” and listen to them, as we work to unite.

Only by adopting a new path-which means, in truth, returning to the original path of our founding ideals-will we again be a country admired and respected at home and abroad.

James Mattis

God · Jedi · Politics

What is Freedom?

freedom/ˈfriːdəm/ Learn to pronounce nounnoun: freedom; noun: freedom from; plural noun: freedom froms; plural noun: freedoms

  1. 1. the power or right to act, speak, or think as one wants.”we do have some freedom of choice” h Similar:right to

entitlement to privilege prerogative due

  • absence of subjection to foreign domination or despotic government. “he was a champion of Irish freedom” h Similar:independence

self-government self-determination self-legislation self rule home rule sovereignty autonomy autarky democracy self-sufficiency individualism separation non-alignment emancipation enfranchisement manumission h Opposite:dependence the power of self-determination attributed to the will; the quality of being independent of fate or necessity. h Similar: scope latitude leeway margin flexibility facility space breathing space room elbow room licence leave free reina free hand leisure carte blanche

  • h Opposite:restriction

2. the state of not being imprisoned or enslaved.”the shark thrashed its way to freedom” h Similar: liberty liberation release emancipation deliverance delivery dischargenon-confinemen textrication amnesty pardoning manumission disenthralment h Opposite:captivity

  • the state of being unrestricted and able to move easily.”the shorts have a side split for freedom of movement”
  • unrestricted use of something.”the dog has the freedom of the house when we are out”

3. the state of not being subject to or affected by (something undesirable).”government policies to achieve freedom from want” h Similar: exemption immunity dispensation exception exclusion release relief reprieve absolution exoneration impunity letting offa let-offderogation h Opposite:liability4. Britisha special privilege or right of access, especially that of full citizenship of a city granted to a public figure as an honour.”he accepted the freedom of the City of Glasgow”5. archaicfamiliarity or openness in speech or behaviour. h Similar: naturalness openness lack of reserve/inhibition casualness informality lack of ceremony spontaneity ingenuousness impudence familiarity over familiarity presumption forwardness

  1. cheek

Origin

Old English frēodōm (see free, -dom).Translate freedom toUse over time for: Freedom

Freedom Tree, Elizabeth Marina, St. Helier, Great Britain

Food for thought!

Ask not what you can do to your country but what your country can do to you.

President Trump is no Kennedy but let your country have a Future and your children have  a Mother or Father an Uncle or an Aunt a Grandparent or guide or most importantly let your future seed have a life.

Ich bin ein Berliner

Ich bin ein Berliner (German pronunciation: [ˈʔɪç ˈbɪn ʔaɪn bɛɐ̯ˈliːnɐ], “I am a Berliner“) is a speech by United States President John F. Kennedy given on June 26, 1963, in West Berlin. It is widely regarded as the best-known speech of the Cold War and the most famous anti-communist speech. Kennedy aimed to underline the support of the United States for West Germany 22 months after Soviet-occupied East Germany erected the Berlin Wall to prevent mass emigration to the West. The message was aimed as much at the Soviets as it was at Berliners and was a clear statement of U.S. policy in the wake of the construction of the Berlin Wall. Another phrase in the speech was also spoken in German, “Lasst sie nach Berlin kommen” (“Let them come to Berlin”), addressed at those who claimed “we can work with the Communists”, a remark at which Nikita Khrushchev scoffed only days later.

The speech is considered one of Kennedy’s best, both a notable moment of the Cold War and a high point of the New Frontier. It was a great morale boost for West Berliners, who lived in an enclave deep inside East Germany and feared a possible East German occupation. Speaking from a platform erected on the steps of Rathaus Schöneberg for an audience of 120,000, Kennedy said,

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https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c0/Audio-input-microphone.svg/50px-Audio-input-microphone.svg.pngIch bin ein Berliner (I am a Berliner) speech Play media Speech from the Rathaus Schöneberg by John F. Kennedy, June 26, 1963. Duration 9:01; “Ich bin ein Berliner” first appears at 1:45, then again at 8:43. Ich bin ein Berliner (“I am a Berliner”) speech (audio) Menu 0:00 Audio-only version (Duration 9:22)
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Part of a series on the
History of Berlin
Coat of arms of the City of Berlin
Margraviate of Brandenburg (1157–1806)
Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918)
German Empire (1871–1918)
Free State of Prussia (1918–1947)
Weimar Republic (1919–1933)
1920s Berlin Greater Berlin Act
Nazi Germany (1933–1945)
Welthauptstadt Germania Bombing of Berlin in World War II Battle of Berlin
West Germany and East Germany (1945–1990)
West Berlin and East Berlin Berlin Wall Berlin Blockade (1948–1949) Berlin Crisis of 1961 “Ich bin ein Berliner” (1963) “Tear Down This Wall” (1987) Fall of the Berlin Wall
Federal Republic of Germany (1990–present)
History of Germany and History of Europe
See also
Timeline of Berlin

June the 2nd 2020 – Where is the Love?

Life · Politics · Republic

Heart of the free world

I see the U.S.A. as the heart of the free world. With Covin-19, your President’s volatile nature where he bates and try’s to control or cancel all and any he see as his opposites or enemies, along with the recent protests over the death of George Floyd. The heart of the free world is really taking a heart beating and palpitating close to having a full on cardiac arrest.

I never wanted to visit the U.S.A. it always looked too dangerous, too scary and finally too expensive. But some of its people that I meet on the World Wide Web are hugely inspiring and influence my views and perspective on life. They appear if in the realms of fantasy and fiction like living legends, earth angels and walking saints.

So in essence the U.S.A is a paradox.

Paradox/ˈparədɒks/ Learn to pronounce nounnoun: paradox; plural noun: paradoxes

  1. a seemingly absurd or contradictory statement or proposition which when investigated may prove to be well founded or true.

Throughout the history of the free world it has many times thought led and beaten back all in the name of freedom. Free thought, free economicsish (ok but true freedom should be a freedom to purchase the perfect product for example clean water not just the right to flog any old shit to anyone i.e. dirty chemically polluted water). Plus your normal lack of safety netting for those that need support to stand up and get back into the economy is just downright destructive to all.

When the U.S.A gifts freedoms to corporations it has forgotten or refused to equally gift both rights and responsibilities of not being ripped off, persecuted, shot, stolen from or killed to its own citizens regardless of race, creed or colour.

Where all are equal but some more than others